Get Graphic » graphic novels

Posts Tagged ‘graphic novels’

Black History Month

Saturday, January 31st, 2015

February is right around the corner, which brings with it Black History Month. In celebration be sure to check out these graphic novel titles!

March Book One by John Lewis:

March is a vivid first-hand account of John Lewis’ lifelong struggle for civil and human rights (including his key roles in the historic 1963 March on Washington and the 1965 Selma-Montgomery March), meditating in the modern age on the distance traveled since the days of Jim Crow and segregation. In March, a true American icon teams up with one of America’s most acclaimed graphic novelists. Together, they bring to life one of our nation’s most historic moments, a period both shameful and inspiring, and a movement whose echoes will be heard for generations.


March Book Two by John Lewis:

Congressman John Lewis, an American icon and one of the key figures of the civil rights movement, continues his award-winning graphic novel trilogy with co-writer Andrew Aydin and artist Nate Powell, inspired by a 1950s comic book that helped prepare his own generation to join the struggle. Now, March brings the lessons of history to vivid life for a new generation, urgently relevant for today’s world. After the success of the Nashville sit-in campaign, John Lewis is more committed than ever to changing the world through nonviolence - but as he and his fellow Freedom Riders board a bus into the vicious heart of the deep south, they will be tested like never before. Faced with beatings, police brutality, imprisonment, arson, and even murder, the young activists of the movement struggle with internal conflicts as well. But their courage will attract the notice of powerful allies, from Martin Luther King, Jr. to Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy.

Strange Fruit. Volume 1, Uncelebrated Narratives From Black History by Joel Christian Gill:

Strange Fruit, Volume I is a collection of stories from African American history that exemplifies success in the face of great adversity. This unique graphic anthology offers historical and cultural commentary on nine uncelebrated heroes whose stories are not often found in history books. Among the stories included are: Henry “Box” Brown, who escaped from slavery by mailing himself to Philadelphia; Alexander Crummel and the Noyes Academy, the first integrated school in America, established in the 1830s; Marshall “Major” Taylor, a.k.a. the Black Cyclone, the first black champion in any sport; and Bass Reeves, the most successful lawman in the Old West. Written and illustrated by Joel Christian Gill, the diverse art beautifully captures the spirit of each remarkable individual and opens a window into an important part of American history. 

Harlem Hellfighters by Max Brooks:

From bestselling author Max Brooks, the riveting story of the highly decorated, barrier-breaking, historic black regiment–the Harlem Hellfighters. In 1919, the 369th infantry regiment marched home triumphantly from World War I. They had spent more time in combat than any other American unit, never losing a foot of ground to the enemy, or a man to capture, and winning countless decorations. Though they returned as heroes, this African American unit faced tremendous discrimination, even from their own government. The Harlem Hellfighters, as the Germans called them, fought courageously on–and off–the battlefield to make Europe, and America, safe for democracy.

March: Book Two

Friday, July 18th, 2014

The cover for March Book Two has been revealed by Top Shelf Productions! Slated for an early 2015 release, the sequel to John Lewis’ bestselling graphic novel will be significantly longer than book one, covering events from 1961-1963. The memoir will contain the famous journey of the Freedom Riders and John Lewis’ involvement in helping plan and lead the 1963 March on Washington (both of which are depicted on the cover).

For more information visit the publisher’s website.

CBLDF “Banned Books Handbook”

Friday, July 11th, 2014

Gearing up for Banned Books Week (September 21-27), the CBLDF has created a free resource that gives an in-depth list of graphic novels that have been banned along with the reason why. The handbook also explains how to report and fight censorship. This is a perfect tool for both librarians and teachers in preparation for Banned Books Week celebrations.

They have also created discussion guides for educators who would like to use banned comics in their teaching. Each guide includes: synopsis, themes, reason challenged, suggested age range, as well as discussion questions and activities to get students talking about the controversial topics in a thought-provoking way.

Summer Reading 2014

Friday, June 20th, 2014

Summer Reading 2014 is underway! This year’s theme is all about science. Looking for something to read? Check out these science related titles!






The Secret Science Alliance and the Copycat Crook by Eleanor Davis

Eleven-year-old Julian Calendar thought changing schools would mean leaving his “nerdy” persona behind, but instead he forms an alliance with fellow inventors Greta and Ben and works with them to prevent an adult from using one of their gadgets for nefarious purposes.






Zita the Spacegirl by Ben Hatke: 

When young Zita discovers a device that opens a portal to another place, and her best friend is abducted, she is compelled to set out on a strange journey from star to star in order to get back home. 





Baby Mouse: Mad Scientist by Jennifer L Holm:

Imaginative Babymouse’s science partner, Felicia the cat, expects her to do all of the work for their report on microscopic creatures, but Babymouse gets help from a pizza-loving amoeba named Squish.







  How to Fake a Moon Landing: Exposing the Myths of Science Denial by Darryl Cunningham:

Is hydro-fracking really safe? Is climate change real? Did the moon landing really happen? How about evolution: fact or fiction? Author-illustrator Darryl Cunningham looks at these and other hot-button science topics and presents a fact-based, visual assessment of current thinking and research on eight different issues everybody’s arguing about.




 T-Minus: The Race to the Moon by Jim Ottaviani

The whole world followed the countdown to sending the first men to the moon. This is the story of the people who made it happen, both in the rockets and behind the scenes.




Hinterkind Vol 1: The Waking World by Ian Edginton

In a post-apocalyptic world where humans have been pushed to the edge of extinction by the creatures of fantasy and fables, THE HINTERKIND tells the story of one young woman’s quest to fulfill her destiny and put the world right again. Fifty-seven years after an unspecified biological event has all but wiped out the human race, a green hand has moved over the face of the Earth. Mother Nature is reclaiming what’s rightfully hers but she’s not the only one… The Hinterkind have returned.





  Y: The Last Man by Brian K. Vaughan

Yorick Brown, an unemployed and unmotivated slacker discovers he is the only male left in the world after a plague instantly kills everyone with a Y chromosome. Accompanied by his mischievous monkey and the mysterious Agent 355, he embarks on a transcontinental journey to find his girlfriend and to discover why he is the last man in earth.




Trinity: A Graphic History of the First Atomic Bomb by Jonathan Fetter-Vorm

Tells the history of the race to build and the decision to drop the first atomic bomb, and the ethical debates that followed. The author sets the stage with early research in Europe, which began prior to World War I and accelerated rapidly as World War II approached.



  Lazarus. Book One, Family by Greg Rucka

In a dystopian near-future, government is a quaint concept, resources are coveted, and possession is 100% of the law. A handful of Families rule, jealously guarding what they have and exploiting the Waste who struggle to survive in their domains. Forever Carlyle defends her family’s holdings through deception and force as their protector, their Lazarus.

Banned Books Week 2014

Friday, June 6th, 2014

The American Library Association (ALA), with the national Banned Books Week planning committee, announced on Wednesday that this year’s Banned Books Week’s theme will focus on comics and graphic novels. Banned Book’s Week is a celebration of the right to read and intellectual freedom. Comics and graphic novels have often been a target of censorship even in recent years. In fact, the Bones series by Jeff Smith was in the top 10 for most frequently challenged books of 2013.  The week long celebration runs this year from September 21-September 27.

You can find more information about Banned Books Week at and

Comic Book Legal Defense Fund also has an excellent write up on Banned Books Week 101!